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20120925
20121003
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: at the united nations, israel's prime minister urged world leaders to draw a clear red line and stop iran's nuclear program. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get two views of benjamin netanyahu's speech in which he warned that tehran could be capable of making an atomic weapon next year. >> brown: then, was the attack on the u.s. mission in libya the work of al qaeda? we take a look. >> woodruff: from our american graduate series, ray suarez reports on growing pains for north dakota schools brought on by the oil boom. >> i always make it very clear to any perspective teachers of what they are really getting themselves into. i tell them this is the new wild west. >> brown: on the "daily download," we examine how the candidates are using video games to push early voting. >> woodruff: and regular pro referees are back on the football field tonight after three weeks of questionable calls by replacements. we talk to npr's mike pesca about the deal struck with th
on the battle for north carolina. jeffrey brown reports on the tightening presidential contest. >> brown: barack obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philos
of what they are really getting themselves into. i tell them this is the new wild west. >> brown: on the "daily download," we examine how the candidates are using video games to push early voting. >> woodruff: and regular pro referees are back on the football field tonight after three weeks of questionable calls by replacements. we talk to npr's mike pesca about the deal struck with the nfl. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacyn the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel's prime minter warned again today that iran iwelln its way to creating a nuclear weapon and said the world needs to act.
. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, marcia coyle of the "national law journal" walks us through a term that will tackle affirmative action, and may decide disputes over same-sex marriage and civil rights law. >> woodruff: then we turn to the presidential campaign and the analysis of stuart rothenberg and susan page as the candidates fine tune their messages days before the first debate. >> brown: we zero in on one issue confronting the candidates. hari sreenivasan reports on the safety net program known as medicaid. >> anyone of us at an advanced age really is just one fall away from a broken hip that could end you up in a nursing home. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with author hedrick smith. his new book explores the dismantling of the american dream for the middle class. >> brown: and we look at oppression and empowerment for women around the world, with journalists and filmmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonig
times. >> brown: of course that won't stop us from watching... especially by chief justice roberts. >> that's right. chief justice roberts is a very conservative justice. i don't think his ruling in the health care law changes that one bit. >> brown: now the case that they did argue today. it's about using u.s. courts to bring international human rights law into effect against multinational corporations. >> right. brown: trying to spit it out. mulley national corporations is what i'm trying to say. >> it involves a 1789 law, the alien tort statute. very simple, straight-forward law that says federal courts have jurisdiction over actions brought by aliens who have been basically injuredded by violations of international law or violations of treaties of the united states. this is oal business. the court heard arguments last term on whether corporations could be held liable under that statute. then it later ordered reargument on a broader question. that is whether these cases can be brought in u.s. courts against any defendant who committed a violation in a foreign country. and today
to deal with for years. >> suarez: when the video was being made, john hopkins principal barry brown was one of the first subjects to be interviewed. he says his middle schooler's have been so professional, he first thought adults were doing most of the work. >> i think my first take i made them stop. my first interview, i had some kids come in and, i mean, i had to pull data. and i was like, "guys, who wrote these questions?" and they were looking at each other, and finally one of the kids was like, "i did." >> suarez: for de'qonton, who wants be a fire fighter and a photographer when he grows up, journalism has given him a reason to stay in school. >> if i didn't have a camera i would probably be led up with the wrong people and doing the wrong stuff, and i wouldn't probably make it to college. >> suarez: and as for his video, which drew attention from local media outlets and is now gaining national exposure, de'qonton says there is one person in particular he's hoping will watch it. >> i want the president to see what i could do and see what young kids, young black american kids.
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)